Practical Handbook of Transportation Contracting and Rate

[PDF / Epub] ✅ Practical Handbook of Transportation Contracting and Rate Negotiations 1st edition By Colin. Barrett – African-american-literature.co In the time worn traditions of the transportation industry ship­ pers and carriers regard one another as enemies There is to be sure a certain degree of validity to such a viewpoint An element of conIn the time worn traditions of the transportation industry ship­ pers and carriers regard one another as enemies There is to be sure a certain degree of validity to such a viewpoint An element of conflict will naturally be present in any vendor purchaser relationship The two after all are seeking distinctly different things from that relationship and to a con­ siderable extent each party's success in realizing its own goals must be achieved at the expense of the other At the same time however viewing that relationship as strictly zero sum a gain by one side always resulting in an equal and offsetting loss by the other is a gross misconception It overlooks the key reality that no matter which party comes closest to its own objectives the relationship and the business transactions that flow from it must ultimately benefit both Without that level of mutual benefit the relationship will simply not exist or will soon founder if it somehow does come into being for it is only the self interest of the two parties that impels them to establish and continue that relationship at all In transportation however this element of mutuality the attitude that the parties share a common interest in nurturing their relationship is often forgotten Instead of working to­ gether as fundamentally partners in a business transaction from which both expect to derive gains they dedicate the bulk of their energies to fighting rather than cooperating with one another.

In the time worn traditions of the transportation industry ship­ pers and carriers regard one another as enemies There is to be sure a certain degree of validity to such a viewpoint An element of conflict will naturally be present in any vendor purchaser relationship The two after all are seeking distinctly different things from that relationship and to a con­ siderable extent each party's success in realizing its own goals must be achieved at the expense of the other At the same time however viewing that relationship as strictly zero sum a gain by one side always resulting in an equal and offsetting loss by the other is a gross misconception It overlooks the key reality that no matter which party comes closest to its own objectives the relationship and the business transactions that flow from it must ultimately benefit both Without that level of mutual benefit the relationship will simply not exist or will soon founder if it somehow does come into being for it is only the self interest of the two parties that impels them to establish and continue that relationship at all In transportation however this element of mutuality the attitude that the parties share a common interest in nurturing their relationship is often forgotten Instead of working to­ gether as fundamentally partners in a business transaction from which both expect to derive gains they dedicate the bulk of their energies to fighting rather than cooperating with one another.

practical download handbook pdf transportation epub contracting book rate mobile negotiations ebok edition book Practical Handbook ebok of Transportation kindle of Transportation Contracting and mobile Handbook of Transportation ebok Handbook of Transportation Contracting and pdf Practical Handbook of Transportation Contracting and Rate Negotiations 1st edition PDFIn the time worn traditions of the transportation industry ship­ pers and carriers regard one another as enemies There is to be sure a certain degree of validity to such a viewpoint An element of conflict will naturally be present in any vendor purchaser relationship The two after all are seeking distinctly different things from that relationship and to a con­ siderable extent each party's success in realizing its own goals must be achieved at the expense of the other At the same time however viewing that relationship as strictly zero sum a gain by one side always resulting in an equal and offsetting loss by the other is a gross misconception It overlooks the key reality that no matter which party comes closest to its own objectives the relationship and the business transactions that flow from it must ultimately benefit both Without that level of mutual benefit the relationship will simply not exist or will soon founder if it somehow does come into being for it is only the self interest of the two parties that impels them to establish and continue that relationship at all In transportation however this element of mutuality the attitude that the parties share a common interest in nurturing their relationship is often forgotten Instead of working to­ gether as fundamentally partners in a business transaction from which both expect to derive gains they dedicate the bulk of their energies to fighting rather than cooperating with one another.

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